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CPVC Piping System Resources

Corzan® Industrial Systems

The resources, advice and insights needed to design long-lasting, reliable industrial systems from the pioneer in CPVC material.

Blog Feature

CPVC Solvent Cement  |  Chemical Processing

CPVC Pipe Joining Methods Impact Efficiency, Productivity

Industrial facilities require reliable equipment that ensures long-term performance for maximum productivity and minimal downtime. When choosing a piping system for an industrial application such as a hydrochloric acid or sodium hypochlorite facility, specifiers must consider the joining method for a piping material and how it will impact labor costs, productivity and service life.

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Blog Feature

Piping Systems

Delivering Value for Your Chemical Piping System

Long-term performance, trouble free operation and consistent results are critical to manufacturing facilities’ operational success. While facilities must first satisfy their functional needs, the initial cost of construction is often a factor when selecting the right piping for a chemical processing plant. Purchase price is only part of the equation when choosing a piping system that will provide long-term performance. A lifecycle cost analysis tailored to the specific application can help you get the best value, considering factors such as fluid temperature, line pressures, the chemical environment, etc.

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Understanding CPVC Piping Report

Understanding CPVC Piping Report

Delve deeper into CPVC's capabilities, benefits and performance in the harshest industrial applications.

Blog Feature

Fabrication

Important Inspection Considerations for Nonmetallic Atmospheric Industrial Vessels and Storage Tanks

An atmospheric tank stores liquids at atmospheric pressure. Contained in one of these vessels may be hydrochloric acid, chlorine dioxide, sulfuric acid or some other corrosive, potentially hazardous solution. Each vessel is specially designed, constructed and installed to meet the specific requirements of the plant. Once the vessel has been put into use, the job is not done. Sometimes, ideal conditions are not perfectly maintained or unforeseen events occur, causing problems for the tank. To keep plant workers safe, and to protect the large investment in the plant, inspections must be a fundamental part of the plant’s safety program. Follow a specified timeline, technique and team to avoid a costly and hazardous failure.

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Blog Feature

Piping Systems

How Proper Piping Material Selection Can Reduce Harmful Biofilm Formation

Biological contamination presents a serious concern for many applications, even in industrial plants. Biofilm formation allows unsafe bacteria and organisms to grow and contaminate supplies of water and other transported fluids. Considering alternative piping materials ideally suited to resist biofilm formation can help minimize this significant health risk.

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Blog Feature

Piping Systems  |  Semiconductor

What Does it Mean for a Pipe to be Fire Resistant?

This post was originally published in November of 2017, and has been updated with more information and resources, including two burn test videos.   When we talk about plastic and fire resistance, most people conjure up images of melting plastic in a campfire or bending plastic spoons with a lighter. While many plastics don’t stand up well to heat and fire (namely polypropylene and polyethylene), it’s not true of all thermoplastics. Specifically, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) is engineered to limit flammability and smoke production. In fact, many applications that specify CPVC piping because of its heat, pressure and corrosion resistance capabilities do so because it also satisfies strict regulations around flame and smoke resistance. But what qualities should you look for in a thermoplastic piping system to ensure it satisfies your application’s fire resistance requirements?

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Blog Feature

Installation Guide  |  Piping Systems

The Dos and Don’ts of CPVC Piping Solvent Cement Welding

This post was originally published in July of 2017, and has been updated with more information and resources, including a solvent cement joint burst test video.   When installing chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) piping systems, you have a few different options to join the piping and fittings. Depending on the pipe size, the pipe and fittings can be threaded or flanged together, each offering a strong, durable union. However, for most applications, Corzan® Industrial Systems recommends solvent cement welding. Solvent cement is not glue. Instead it is a fast, easy installation process that uses solvents and resin to chemically fuse the pipe and fitting together at a molecular level, essentially creating one continuous piece of plastic. In fact, solvent cement is the only joining method recommended for system features like expansion loops because it allows the pipe to bend and move without breaking or weakening the joint seal. To ensure the solvent cement is applied properly throughout your process system, we've put together the following dos and don’ts to remember throughout the seven step joining process. If the provided solvent cement installation do's and don'ts are followed, see how reliable the joints become by watching the burst test video below.

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Blog Feature

Chemical Processing  |  Piping Systems

Why CPVC Is Ideally Suited for the Chemical Processing Industry

The following is an excerpt from “CPVC Use in the Chemical Processing Industry.” Download the full ebook to learn more about where CPVC can be used in the chemical processing industry, which chemicals CPVC stands up against and how CPVC compares to alternatives in various applications.   The chemicals market, according to Chemical Processing, is currently worth around $1 trillion and is projected to grow to more than $5 trillion by 2022. With 40,000 existing facilities—and thousands more planned—the chemical processing industry (CPI) is becoming increasingly competitive. Broadly defined as the chemical conversion of raw materials to finished products, the Chemical Processing Industry includes the following (and much more): Traditional chemicals, both organic and inorganic Petroleum Petrochemical Refining Pharmaceutical facilities Marine support and offshore In this growing sector, plant managers and engineers seek systems that are more cost effective, reliable and specially engineered to meet their process’ demands. What is the role of piping material selection in recognizing greater plant performance and reliability?

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Blog Feature

Installation Guide  |  Piping Systems

Can Corzan CPVC Piping Be Buried?

This post was originally published in November of 2017, but has been updated to be more comprehensive, including a video of CPVC during an impact test.   Whether used for general drainage, fire suppression, mining, or another industrial application, CPVC piping systems may need to be run underground. Most concerns about underground CPVC usage arise from incorrect assumptions about CPVC’s physical properties, specifically impact resistance. Underground piping is exposed to: Various-sized rocks and other abrasives. The weight of the backfill and any surfacing material. Vehicle and/or machinery traffic (depending on the application). Corrosives found within the soil. Fluctuating, potentially extreme temperatures. These potentially harmful conditions beg the question: Can CPVC piping be buried?

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Blog Feature

Wastewater Treatment

Safer Alternatives to Chlorine Gas for Water and Wastewater Treatment Disinfection

In the 1930s, chlorine gas became commercially available and applications around the world began to take advantage of it as a disinfectant. Today, chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant in water and wastewater treatment processes. Growing concern over the past few decades about the health and safety of chlorine, especially in its gaseous state, has many plants considering alternatives.

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Blog Feature

Piping Systems

The Fundamentals of Industrial Piping System Inspections

In March of 2005, an explosion at a Texas City BP oil refinery (the third largest in the United States) killed 15 workers, injured another 180 and severely damaged the plant. The explosion occurred when a distillation tower flooded with hydrocarbons and became over pressurized. Though not directly caused by a piping failure, it was largely the result of improper safety procedures and red flags over the preceding decade, including: Broken alarms Broken gauges Overly thinned pipe Five managers over a six year span A critical component of plant safety, which could help prevent the next failure, is to learn how to maintain and inspect the piping system as part of a comprehensive process safety management (PSM) program. Properly implemented programs help prevent events like the catastrophic Texas City refinery explosion.

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